Writersblog

Salomon Kroonenberg

Salomon Kroonenberg, Dutch writer

The Dutch programme at the International Book Fair in Beijing was cunn... >>> read more

Henk Pröpper

Henk Pröpper, Director Dutch Foundation for Literature

In two weeks’ time, the official opening of one of the largest b... >>> read more

Kai Kang

Kai Kang, Journalist China Reading Weekly

Dear Dutch publishers. The book fair is over. Perhaps you’ll now... >>> read more

Ingrid and Dieter Schubert

Ingrid and Dieter Schubert, Dutch illustrators

The days are full and long. We are incessantly bombarded with impressi... >>> read more

Michele Hutchison

Michele Hutchison, Editor De Arbeiderspers

Arriving on the stand on the first day, I’d asked a Chinese visi... >>> read more

Michele Hutchison

Michele Hutchison, Editor De Arbeiderspers

Big excitement today since we were finally meeting with Songyu from Fl... >>> read more

Ingrid and Dieter Schubert

Ingrid and Dieter Schubert, Dutch illustrators

It’s now the third day, and the first one with plenty of sun. Un... >>> read more

Kai Kang

Kai Kang, Journalist China Reading Weekly

What a great opportunity to learn about the Dutch literature for Chine... >>> read more

Salomon Kroonenberg

Salomon Kroonenberg, Dutch writer

A duck flies to and fro over the vast expanses of world ocean, despera... >>> read more

Michele Hutchison

Michele Hutchison, Editor De Arbeiderspers

‘In the era of browsing, we provide reading.’ - Slogan see... >>> read more

Michele Hutchison

Michele Hutchison, Editor De Arbeiderspers

The jewel in the crown of our collection of Arbeiderspers titles publi... >>> read more

Michele Hutchison

Michele Hutchison, Editor De Arbeiderspers

The Chinese publishers I have met during the course of my career, the ... >>> read more

Salomon Kroonenberg

Salomon Kroonenberg, Dutch writer

I have so far never been to a book fair. Nor do I know what to imagine... >>> read more

Kai Kang

Kai Kang, Journalist China Reading Weekly

Since 2006, I began writing about the Netherlands’ performance a... >>> read more

Henk Pröpper

Henk Pröpper, Director Dutch Foundation for Literature

Now that the fair is just round the corner, this is perhaps the moment... >>> read more

Michele Hutchison

Michele Hutchison, Editor De Arbeiderspers

The traffic in Beijing is horrendous, I’m sure the other blogger... >>> read more

Thomas Möhlmann

Thomas Möhlmann, Staff member Dutch Foundation for Literature

What an evening the poets and the approximately 200 onlookers present ... >>> read more


Judith Eiselin - Jim (Illustrator Monique Bauman)

Judith Eiselin - Jim (Illustrator Monique Bauman)

Judith Eiselin is one of those rare children’s writers capable of entering into the heads of their characters, in this case eleven-year-old Kiki Moerman. Kiki’s fourteen-year-old brother Jelmer is highly gifted but extremely sensitive. He goes off into his own dimension and can’t stand anything new or different. Family life revolves around him, to the extent that no one really seems to function as they should. Narrator Kiki, who believes ‘words are important’, feels ‘no one in this family fits together’. She starts to wish the others weren’t there at all.

Visiting her grandma, also called Kiki, she finds a grubby postcard in the wastepaper basket signed ‘Jim’ and hopes it was actually meant for her. Already wondering whether her quarrelling parents are her real mum and dad, she can now daydream about Jim, a cool brother who’s out there looking for her. It’s the start of an adventure-packed quest. Beautifully evocative scenes and subtle clues reinforce Kiki’s wishful thinking.

On the family’s summer holiday to the Channel Island of Sark, Kiki sees special signs everywhere in the form of letters, tickets and maps, all brought to life in Monique Bauman’s photographic illustrations. A dark cave and a rising tide are the prelude to an unexpected and moving finale that proves ‘you actually only ever know very little about what other people know’.

Biography

Judith Eiselin grew up with a twin sister, a journalist father and a mother who ran a puppet show. By the age of six she wanted to become a writer. After studying Dutch she was a children’s book reviewer at NRC Handelsblad for ten years before deciding to fulfill her dream. Her books, which include Jesleia’s Eyes (2004) and The 1001 Secrets of Eva Zout (2006), have been widely praised for their empathy and their style, which is contemporary without being trendy.

Quotes

  • ‘An exciting, well-written holiday adventure.’ – NRC Handelsblad